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Chemnitz's Works, Volume 5 (Enchiridion/Lord's Supper/Lord's Prayer)

Title: 
Chemnitz's Works, Volume 5 (Enchiridion/Lord's Supper/Lord's Prayer)
$54.99

Martin Chemnitz (the “Second Martin”) is credited with solidifying and defining the Reformation movement begun by Martin Luther (the “First Martin”). Chemnitz was a major contributor to the Formula of Concord and is considered to be one of the greatest Lutheran theologians of all time.

This volume of Chemnitz’s Works contains three writings of this 16th-century professor, pastor, and church superintendent. It provides the opportunity to learn firsthand from this systematic and pastoral theologian.

Ministry, Word, and Sacraments: the Enchiridion

This is a translation of Chemnitz's ‘little book’ for pastors. It covers the Call into the Ministry, the Word and Sacraments, ceremonies of the church, and the conduct of ministers.
Includes Index and end notes.

The Lord’s Supper

This is an English translation of De coena Domini, Chemnitz's defense of the real presence of Christ's body and blood together with the bread and wine in the Lord’s Supper.

Arguing from Scripture and fortifying his presentation with many citations from the ancient church fathers, Chemnitz explains that the real presence does not entail a crass, cannibalistic eating, but a sacramental eating of Christ’s true body and blood. Chemnitz maintains that the Words of Institution are the last will and testament of the Son of God and are therefore to be taken literally and understood with the utmost seriousness. Figurative interpretations of the Words should be avoided because they are bound to be uncertain, and they rob the Christian of the comfort furnished by Christ's body and blood, given and shed for the forgiveness of sins.

The Lord's Prayer

God Commands us to pray, and twice in the New Testament, Jesus gives us the pattern for prayer in the Our Father.
In this work, whose full title is A Substantial and Godly Exposition of the Prayer Commonly Call the Lord's Prayer, Chemnitz unpacks the richness of each petition of the Lord's Prayer: how many words to use, what things to ask for, and in what order to ask for them. He offers a fresh and inspiring interpretation based on the biblical texts. The English translation of this work was originally published in 1598 by the University of Cambridge in England at a time when theologians were becoming increasingly aware of the power of the press. This edition, updated to modern English by Georg Williams, makes Chemnitz's timeless exposition available to today's readers.